Economy and Elections in Turkey: The Invisible Hands

Hossam ElShazly

The Turkish economy is an impressive one; with 7.4% economic growth and the creation of one million jobs, Turkey was the fastest growing G-20 economy in 2017. This growth exceeded all expectations including the IMF ones and surpassed the Chinese figures, hitting a new record. The socioeconomic measures showed rapid improvement as the income of Turkish citizens has doubled more than once during recent years. President Erdogan has paid great attention to improving the military industry infrastructure; Ankara spends around $18 billion on the defence budget annually and half of its equipment is made domestically. Records show a 18% increase in defence exports in 2017, reaching $1.65 billion, and President Erdogan aims to produce defence exports worth $25 billion by 2023.

In an attempt to secure the country’s democratic transition and to avoid being trapped in the critical zone, Mr.Erdogan accepted moving the planned elections of 2019 forward by more than a year. However, the devil was wearing an election tag, and the economic situation deteriorated dramatically. The Turkish Lira hit its lowest point in eight years, recording 4.39 against the Dollar and resulting in a 13% loss. Speculations about the ability of the central bank and the government to manage the crisis have been discussed in regional and global media on a daily basis. The talk about the economic voting in the forthcoming elections on the 24 June occupies all the news headlines.

elections-turkey-turkish-early-election-ballot-box-flag-symbol-parliamentary-hand-puts-115594559

Looking Behind the Charts: 

The conventional wisdom will be that we are facing an economic tragedy moving at a rocket speed heading towards its target on the election day to hit Erdogan. Nevertheless, looking behind the charts, and digging deep in the story, several questions remain unanswered. Are we witnessing a natural economic disaster that follows the rule that success breeds active inertia and active inertia breeds failure? Or are we watching another planned orchestrated crisis designed to remove President Erdogan via reinventing the 2016 failing coup attempt in a new economic vehicle? 

To answer these questions, we should explore the Turkish case in the context of its geopolitical relations, its role in the region, economic rivals, the nature of ties and diplomatic relations with major players in the region.

The Invisible Hands: Egypt, UAE, Saudi Arabia and Israel

Economic collapse is not a product of a few weeks and not in the case of the strong Turkish economy. The ongoing tension with other regimes in the region, in addition to the forecasted conflict of interest, offers a better explanation of the foggy picture.

I argue that Turkey represents the only remaining form of the democratic transition state in the region. In Egypt, a similar orchestrated economic crisis involved a fuel shortage story and faked inflation among other tools, which were used to remove the first freely elected President in 2013 via a military coup led by field-marshal Abdelfattah AlSisi, the current Egyptian President. Not surprisingly, UAE, Israel and Saudi Arabia (the same group in the Turkish case) were the main supporters of the Egyptian coup. Injected billions of dollars in the Egyptian economy, they attempted to support the Sisi regime after the successful coup. The two Gulf states saw the new-born democratic Egypt as a direct threat to their Monarchies. Israel considered the rise of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt as a critical threat being unable to maintain control over the elected government.

In contrast, Erdogan had close ties with Morsi, stands firmly against the coup and hosts thousands of Egyptian opposition groups and members of the former government.

Erdgoan Morsi

On June 5, 2017, the same invisible hand decided to cut ties and blockaded Qatar based on acquisitions that Qatar was supporting the free press, Egyptian opposition, and Hamas. President Erdgoan has been a major supporter of Doha on this front and all acquisitions were rejected by the international community.

In the same context, the tension between Ankara and Israel goes back to the Davos incident in 2009, when Erdogan stormed out of a World Economic Forum debate following a clash with the Israeli president over Israel’s offensive against Gaza. Bilateral relations deteriorated when Israeli naval commandos intercepted the Turkish ship Marmara en route to breach the Israeli blockade of Gaza. That incident led to the deaths of eight Turks and one Turkish-American. Recently, the picture turned black because Erdogan is the only leader in the region who clearly stood against the announcement of Jerusalem as the official capital of Israel, expelled the Israeli ambassador from Ankara and calling Israel a terrorist state over the killing of civilians in Gaza.

Erdogan Davos

In recent years, the charismatic president has become a symbolic leader across the Arabic and Islamic world; he has even been called Sultan Erdogan among people in the Arabic and Islamic streets. Turkish cinema is significant in magnifying this leadership role and has brought the legacy of the Ottoman Empire to the hearts and minds of hundreds of millions of people around the world. The leaders of the invisible hand’s group lack this Erdoganian-charismatic style and consider it a real threat to their crowns and regimes. Furthermore, Erdogan’s futuristic vision of Turkey in 2023 following the end of the Lausanne treaty, controlling the channel linking between the two seas Black and Marmara and beginning oil exploration and drilling, is another nightmare for the invisible hand’s group and some countries in the west.

Voting the Future on June 24: 

In the view of the above, there are no doubts that Erdogan’s vision and philosophy represent a significant threat to the invisible hand’s group in addition to some western countries on both the political and economic fronts. It is my argument that these countries will endeavour to reinvent a new economic coup on the way to the June 24 elections, as confirmed by the Turkish Prime Minister in his recent TV interview.

However, the answer to the futuristic question about where Turkey is heading remains in the hands of the Turkish people who will vote for their next president soon. The choice is whether to continue Erdogan’s remarkable economic and power journey heading toward 2023 or to fall into the trap of manipulated politics, political instability, regional and global influence, in the best-case scenario landing on a toxic economic zone similar to the one of Egypt.

التجنيد الإلزامي في الدول الخليجية الجديدة

  • إليونورا أردماني
  • في الأنظمة الملكية الخليجية، تقف العلاقات المدنية-العسكرية عند منعطف. فخلافاً للمنظومة

    كانت قطر الدولة الخليجية الأولى التي طبّقت التجنيد الإلزامي للذكور في العام 2013، ففرضت على الشباب الذين تتراوح أعمارهم من 18 إلى 35 عاماً التسجّل لأداء الخدمة العسكرية لمدة تتراوح من 3 إلى 4 أشهر – ومدّدتها إلى عام كامل في آذار/مارس 2018. وحذت الإمارات العربية المتحدة حذوها في العام 2014، ففرضت على الشباب الذين تتراوح أعمارهم من 18 إلى 30 عاماً الخدمة العسكرية لمدّة تتراوح من 9 أشهر إلى عامَين، بحسب مستواهم العلمي، وفي العام 2017، أعادت الكويت أيضاً العمل بالتجنيد الإلزامي لمدة عام واحد للذكور في الفئة العمرية 18-35 عاماً، بعدما كانت قد ألغته في العام 2001. وفي قطر، يمكن استدعاء الأشخاص الذين أتمّوا خدمتهم العسكرية، إلى الخدمة الفعلية بحسب الاقتضاء، في غضون الأعوام العشرة اللاحقة حتى سن الأربعين، وفي حالة الحرب، أو فرض القانون العسكري، يمكن الاحتفاظ بالمجنّدين الإلزاميين حتى بعد انتهاء مدّة خدمتهم. كذلك باستطاعة الكويت استدعاء المجنّدين السابقين لمدّة 30 يوماً في السنة حتى بلوغهم سن الـ45، وتفرض الإمارات خضوع المجنّدين السابقين لتدريبات سنوية تمتد لأسبوعَين إلى أربعة أسابيع حتى بلوغهم سن الـ58 (أو الـ60 في حالة الضباط).

    لا يُستدعى جميع الرجال المسجّلين في هذه البلدان، إلى الخدمة، وتُجيز القوانين التأجيل والإعفاء – مثلاً في الكويت والإمارات وقطر، وإلى جانب الأسباب الصحية، يمكن إعفاء الشخص من التجنيد الإلزامي إذا كان “نجل شهيد” ويؤدّي أيضاً دور المعيل الأساسي لأسرته. إنما تُفرَض عقوبات ماليةوجزائية على المتهرّبين من التجنيد الإلزامي أو مَن يمتنعون عن التسجّل.

    علاوةً على ذلك، أطلقت الإمارات التجنيد الطوعي للإناث لفترة تسعة أشهر في حزيران/يونيو 2014، ثم مدّدتها إلى اثنَي عشر شهراً في العام 2016. وفعلت قطر الأمر عينه في آذار/مارس 2018؛ وفي 26 شباط/فبراير 2018، أعلنت السعودية أيضاً بدء الخدمة العسكرية الطوعية للإناث. كذلك اقترح وزير الدفاع الكويتي، ناصر صباح الأحمد الصباح، فرض التجنيد الإلزامي للإناث.

    على النقيض، في شباط/فبراير 2018، استبعد نائب رئيس اللجنة الأمنية في مجلس الشورى السعودي، اللواء عبد الهادي العمري، إمكانية فرض التجنيد الإلزامي للذكور السعوديين، معلِّلاً ذلك بأن التجنيد الطوعي لا يزال يلبّي احتياجات القوات المسلحة السعودية على صعيد العديد البشري. بيد أن عدداً كبيراً من الأصوات السعودية أبدى في العلن دعمه لفرض الخدمة العسكرية الإلزامية، ومنهم مفتي المملكة الشيخ عبد العزيز آل الشيخ، الذي شدّد على ضرورة التدريب العسكري للذكور في أزمنة التهديدات الجيوسياسية المتصاعدة، وعضو مجلس الشورى إقبال درندري التي دعت إلىتطبيق التجنيد الإلزامي للذكور والإناث معتبرةً أنه واجب وطني.

    يعكس هذا الاعتماد على التجنيد الإلزامي الجهود التي تبذلها الأنظمة الملكية في الخليج للتعامل مع التغييرات الإقليمية المترابطة. على وجه الخصوص، أدّى الهبوط في أسعار النفط العالمية إلى تراجع قدرة تلك الأنظمة على تأمين الرعاية الاجتماعية والمنافع للرعايا الأجانب، بما في ذل أولئك الذين خدموا في جيوشها. كما أن عدم الاستقرار الإقليمي والحضور المتنامي للأفرقاء المتشددين غير الدولتيين ولّدا رغبة في توطيد الرابط الوطني. على الرغم من المخاطر السياسية المحتملة التي ينطوي عليها التجنيد الإلزامي، إنه تكتيك فاعل لتعزيز الولاء والحس الوطني، وفق ما ظهر في مراحل التوريث الملكي. فعلى سبيل المثال، أُقِرّ قانون الخدمة الوطنية في قطر في تشرين الثاني/نوفمبر 2013، بعد أشهر قليلة من تسلّم الشيخ تميم بن حمد آل ثاني سدّة العرش في حزيران/يونيو. ويتزامن القرار الذي اتخذته السعودية بإفساح المجال أمام النساء للالتحاق بالخدمة العسكرية، مع عمليات عسكرية غير مسبوقة في اليمن، وإعادة تنظيم كاملة للقطاع الأمني، و”السعودة” التدريجية لليد العاملة التي يطبّقها ولي العهد وزير الدفاع محمد بن سلمان.

    يسلّط الخطاب العام مزيداً من الضوء على الهدف الذي تسعى إليه دول الخليج. فالخدمة العسكرية الإلزامية سوف تساعد القطريين ليصبحوا “مواطنين مثاليين“، وفق ما جاء على لسان وزير الدولة القطري لشؤون الدفاع، اللواء الركن حمد بن علي العطية، قبل إطلاق البرنامج، مسلِّطاً الضوء على الغرض الذي تتوخّاه المبادرة في مجال التربية المدنية: تشكّل المحاضرات عن التاريخ الوطني والأمن والمواطَنة جزءاً من برنامج الخدمة الوطنية القطري، وهو نموذج اقتدت به الإمارات والكويت لدى إطلاقهما التجنيد الإلزامي. وقد تعمد قطر أيضاً إلى استثمار مزيد من الموارد المالية والبشرية في الخدمة العسكرية: تساهم المقاطعة التي تفرضها السعودية والإمارات والبحرين راهناً على قطر، في تعزيز المشاعر القومية لدى القطريين الذين يميلون أكثر من أي وقت مضى، إلى الأخذ بالرأي القائل بأنه من واجبهم أن يقدّموا خدمة عسكرية إلى بلادهم.

    كذلك صيغت الخدمة العسكرية في الإمارات في شكل برنامج تعليمي وطني يُكمّل مقرر التدريب العسكري الأساسي والمتخصص. حتى إن الإمارات أقدمت، في آذار/مارس 2016، على افتتاح مدرسة الخدمة الوطنية لحرس الرئاسة من أجل تأمين مزيد من التدريب التطبيقي، وتسعى إلى أن يستقر عدد المسجّلين في المدرسة عند صفَّين من 5000 مجنّد لكل صف في السنة. في العام 2016، أطلقت الإمارات نسخة مختصرة إضافية من الخدمة الوطنية للمتطوعين الذكور في الفئة العمرية 30-40 عاماً الذين يرغبون في الالتحاق بالخدمة العسكرية، فضلاً عن “خدمة بديلة” قائمة على العمل الإداري أو التقني ومخصّصة للمتطوعين الذين لا يستوفون الشروط الأساسية.

    يمزج التجنيد الإلزامي، مقروناً بالسياسات الخارجية ذات الدوافع العسكرية، بين التعبئة الوطنية وبثّ القوة في الخارج. يَظهر هذا الرابط بوضوح في الحداد الجماعي للجيوش الخليجية على جنودها – معظمهم من الإماراتيين – الذين لقوا مصرعهم في الحرب في اليمن. فبالإضافة إلى جنود حرس الرئاسة، أُرسِل بعض المجنّدين الإلزاميين الإماراتيين إلى اليمن، على الرغم من غياب الخبرة القتالية لديهم، مع العلم بأن الإمارات توقّفت عن إرسال هؤلاء المجنّدين بعد الهجوم الذي شنّه الحوثيون في مأرب وأسفر عن مقتل 45 إماراتياً في الرابع من أيلول/سبتمبر 2015. تُكرّم وسائل الإعلام المحلية والحكّام هؤلاء الجنود الذين يعتبرونهم شهداء الأمة، وفي تشرين الثاني/نوفمبر 2016، بادر مكتب شؤون أسر الشهداء إلى إنشاء واحة الكرامة في أبو ظبي، وهي عبارة عن نصب تذكاري دائم تكريماً للجنود الإماراتيين الذين قضوا نحبهم في خدمة الأمة.

    كذلك تستخدم دول الخليج التجنيد الإلزامي لدعم السياسات المتعلقة بالشؤون الوطنية. فعلى سبيل المثال، تسعى الإمارات إلى خفض أعداد الرعايا الأجانب في الجيش، والذين كانوا يشكّلون نحو أربعين في المئة من القوات المسلحة في التسعينيات. وقد أعطت الإمارات العربية المتحدة، منذ ذلك الوقت، الأولوية للتجنيد من الإمارات الشمالية مثل رأس الخيمة، التي تضم مجتمعةً 61 في المئة من السكان، وذلك بهدف تعزيز روابطها مع أبو ظبي وزيادة الدعم الذي تقدّمه قبائل الإمارات الشمالية للجيش – وهي علاقة من شأن التجنيد الإلزامي أن يساهم في توطيدها. في خطوة مهمة، أعلنتالإمارات، في آب/أغسطس 2015، أن الأشخاص المولودين من أمهات إماراتيات وآباء أجانب (والممنوعين راهناً من الحصول على الجنسية) يصبحون مؤهّلين لنيل الجنسية في حال انضموا طوعاً إلى الخدمة الوطنية.

    بالمثل، صوّت مجلس الأمة الكويتي مجدداً، في آذار/مارس 2018، على السماح للـ”بدون” الذين لا جنسية لهم، بالانضمام إلى الجيش، بعدما كانت هذه الممارسة قد توقّفت في العام 2004، وعلى البدء بقبول المتطوعين غير الكويتيين بصفة ضباط متعاقدين وضباط صف. على الرغم من أن أحد الأسباب وراء هذه الإجراءات هو معالجة التراجع في أعداد المتطوعين العسكريين في الكويت خلال الأعوام العشرة الماضية، إلا أن خيار فرض إلزامية الخدمة الوطنية – بدلاً من الاعتماد على المرتزقة – يسلّط الضوء على سعي الحكومة إلى ترسيخ الهوية الجماعية عن طريق الجيش.

    في الكويت، يدعم التجنيد الإلزامي أيضاً الأهداف الاقتصادية الوطنية. فعلى الرغم من أن البلاد تضم نحو 6500 رجل ينتمون إلى الفئة العمرية المشمولة بالتجنيد الإلزامي بموجب القانون، إلا أن 140 منهم فقط التحقوا بالدفعة الأولى من مجنّدي الخدمة الوطنية. فبالإضافة إلى الشباب الذين لم يتسجّلوا ضمن المهلة المحددة، حصل 2233 شاباً من المؤهّلين للتجنيد الإلزامي، على إعفاء لدواعي التحصيل العلمي. علاوةً على ذلك، أبدى مجتمع الأعمال خشيته من أن إعادة العمل بالتجنيد الإلزامي قد تؤدّي إلى تعطيل الحياة المهنية للأشخاص، فوافق مجلس الأمة على إعفاء موظّفي القطاع الخاص من التجنيد الإلزامي. يشجّع هذا القرار المواطنين الكويتيين على اختيار العمل في القطاع الخاص، نظراً إلى أن القطاع العام يعاني من التخمة.

    في الوقت نفسه، تسعى هذه السياسات إلى التعويض عن الإجراءات غير الشعبية الأخيرة، ومنها خفض الدعم الحكومي وزيادة الضرائب – لا سيما بدء العمل بالضرائب على القيمة المضافة في السعودية والإمارات في كانون الثاني/يناير 2018، واتّجاه دول الخليج الأخرى إلى اعتماد هذه الضرائب في العام 2019. في هذا السياق، يأتي الجنود في موقع الصدارة الرمزية على صعيد التضحيات التي تُطلَب راهناً من جميع المواطنين. فهذا لا يؤدّي فقط إلى الحد من المعارضة للخفض التدريجي للرعاية الاجتماعية، إنما يتيح أيضاً للحكّام أو أولياء العهد الجدد اعتماد السياسات الخارجية ذات الدوافع العسكرية التي يعوّلون عليها لإظهار أنفسهم في صورة القادة الأقوياء.

    إذاً، الدافع الأساسي وراء الإجراءات الهرمية من الأعلى إلى الأسفل لزيادة مشاركة المواطنين في الأنشطة العسكرية، هو الأهداف الاجتماعية والثقافية، مثل تعزيز الشعور القومي، بدلاً من الأغراض محض العسكرية، مثل إنشاء قوة احتياطية، وهو ليس بالمهمة السهلة نظراً إلى النسبة المتدنّية للمواطنين في الدول الخليجية الصغيرة – مثلاً، يشكّل المواطنون نحو 12 في المئة فقط من سكّان قطر، و11 في المئة من سكان الإمارات.

    تعمد الأنظمة الملكية الخليجية تدريجاً إلى إعادة صياغة نموذجها التقليدي للعلاقات المدنية-العسكرية، الذي استند حصراً في السابق إلى أمن النظام والاستراتيجيات المانِعة للانقلابات، في حين أنه كان هناك فصل واضح بين الجنود والمدنيين. وهكذا يؤدّي الجنود الآن، عبر تحريك الهويات الوطنية، دور “المحدِّثين” الذين يبنون علاقات وطيدة بين المجتمع والقوات المسلحة. في هذا الإطار، تعمد دول الخليج بصورة مطردة إلى استخدام التجنيد الإلزامي والتعامل معه كمشروع للهندسة الوطنية من أجل الحصول على الدعم الشعبي الذي تحتاج إليه هذه الدول لتحقيق الانتقال إلى نماذج ما بعد المنظومة الريعية، في خضم أجواء إقليمية متشنّجة.

    * تُرجم هذا المقال من اللغة الإنكليزية.
    إليونورا أردماغني زميلة بحوث معاوِنة في المعهد الإيطالي للدراسات السياسية الدولية، ومحلّلة في مؤسسة الكلية الدفاعية التابعة للناتو، وفي معهد أسبن-إيطاليا.